“I Am a Burden” (False Identity Series: IV) - Kamini Wood

“I Am a Burden” (False Identity Series: IV)

I Am a Burden man isolated early morning

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Have you ever thought to yourself “I Am a Burden”?

Many People who live with anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, or other health conditions often feel that their illness is a burden to their family members, partner, or friends. If you suffer from any of these conditions, you’ve probably felt guilty and worried about causing your loved ones a lot of difficulty, work, or concern. You may even feel lonely, unloved, or abandoned. 

Sometimes, a negative mindset of being a burden stems from early childhood. This occurs when you internalized the belief that you are a burden from a young age. Children who grow up believing that they are a burden often develop into adults who lack confidence and struggle with feelings of inadequacy and worthlessness.

The long-term effects of internalizing the belief that you are a burden may cause difficulties in all aspects of your life. This can also lead to intense feelings of isolation and loneliness.

Believing That You Are a Burden Can Stop You from Seeking Help

Your negative mindset may keep you quiet about your struggle with mental illness. You may avoid talking about what you are going through with your family members, partner, or your friends. You begin to isolate yourself from the world because you don’t want your condition to hinder your loved ones. You break up with your partner because you don’t want to bring them down with you. You don’t receive a much-needed treatment because you bottle up your struggle and never seek help. 

The Mindset of Being a Burden can Push You in a Codependent Relationship

The script of being a burden can diminish your self-esteem and nudge you to go over and beyond to please other people. Our need to please others usually stems from self-esteem issues. If you grew up with family members who mistreated you, you probably tried to please them in the hope of better treatment. over time, approval-craving, and the desire to please others became a lasting pattern. Because you don’t want to be a burden, you never stand up for yourself. Instead, you will allow others to take advantage of you. You may engage in codependent relationships and constantly seek approval.  

Believing That You Are a Burden Increases Feelings of Guilt and Worthlessness

Feeling like a burden on your family and friends only adds to your feelings of guilt, inadequacy, and worthlessness. Your guilty feelings might even lead to suicidal thoughts, as you might think that everyone would be better off without you, or that no one would miss you if you were gone. 

This is not true though. People in our lives care about us much more than we might think. Close people that you can trust will never think of you as of a burden. Opening up to them about how you feel can be the best thing you can do for yourself! 

Through coaching these old stories can be identified and can be shifted. But you need a coach who is versed in making these ontological changes. If you are ready to make those shifts, book a time to speak about what’s possible for you www.chatwithkamini.com

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